Call us at (970) 491-6384
Our purpose is to provide a safe and affirming space for the students we serve at Colorado State University, while supporting systemic change to end all forms of oppression within our community.
What is Dating Violence?

Many times we only hear about abusive relationships existing in marriage. This is not true; many violent relationships begin when two people are dating.

An abusive relationship consists of two people dealing with the issue of power and control in their relationship. One partner feels the need to be in constant control and will use physical and mental abuse to obtain this control. Many college students experience these types of abuse in their relationships.

Facts about Abuse

  • One out of five college students have reported at least one incidence of premarital abuse in their relationship varying from slapping and hitting to more life threatening violence. (Domestic Violence Prevention and Services)
  • Typically, in 72-77% of the cases, violence occurs only after a couple has become seriously involved, rather than in the early, more casual, stages of dating. (Angela Browne, When Battered Women Kill)
  • Violence can occur in all kinds of relationships (heterosexual, gay, lesbian) and although women are more often abused, men are victims, too.

Advocates are available to provide confidential crisis intervention and emotional support through the Women and Gender Advocacy Center. We provide information about academic, legal, medical, emotional, and student conduct resources to survivors of relationship violence. We also offer support to secondary survivors, such as intimate partners, friends, family, and you.

Call 970-491-6384 during business hours M-F. An advocate is available for walk-ins or scheduled appointments during business hours. All information shared with advocates is confidential unless the person is a danger to themselves, someone is in imminent danger, a child currently under 18 has been abused or if the perpetrator is currently in a position of power over minors (even if the survivor is over the age of 18).