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Our purpose is to provide a safe and affirming space for the students we serve at Colorado State University, while supporting systemic change to end all forms of oppression within our community.

Sexual Contact

Any deliberate sexual touching, however slight, of a person’s body (including but not limited to mouth, genitalia, groin, breasts, buttocks, or clothing covering those areas), or causing a person to touch his or her own sexual or intimate parts, may be considered sexual contact.

Effective Consent

Consent can only be obtained if:

  • The person has knowledge of the situation (if a person is under the influence of alcohol or drugs to the extent they cannot make a decision, they cannot give consent.)

  • Free Will: The person must consent without coercion or force.

  • Cooperation in ACT and Nature. 

If consent is not obtained and someone makes sexual contact, it is sexual assault.

Sexual Coercion

Sexual coercion (or sexual assault) is defined as unwanted sexual penetration that occurs after a person is pressured in a nonphysical way. Sexual coercion refers to unwanted vaginal, oral, or anal sex after being pressured in ways that included being worn down by someone who repeatedly asked for sex or showed they were unhappy; feeling pressured by being lied to, being told promises that were untrue, having someone threaten to end a relationship or spread rumors; and sexual pressure due to someone using their influence or authority.

Unwanted sexual contact is defined as unwanted sexual experiences involving touch but not sexual penetration, such as being kissed in a sexual way, or having sexual body parts fondled or grabbed.

Non-contact unwanted sexual experiences are those unwanted experiences that do not involve any touching or penetration, including someone exposing their sexual body parts, flashing, or masturbating in front of the victim, someone making a victim show his or her body parts, someone making a victim look at or participate in sexual photos or movies, or someone harassing the victim in a public place in a way that made the victim feel unsafe.

Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is any type of sexual contact where the primary actor does not receive consent. Sexual assault is an umbrella term used to describe a wide variety of actions, including rape. However, it is not synonymous with rape.

Attempted Sexual Assault

Attempts to commit sexual assault (as described above), as is aiding in any way the commission of sexual assault.

Rape 

Rape is defined as any completed or attempted unwanted vaginal, oral, or anal penetration through the use of physical force (such as being pinned or held down, or by the use of violence) or threats to physically harm and includes times when the victim was drunk, high, drugged, or passed out and unable to consent. Rape is separated into three types, completed forced penetration, attempted forced penetration, and completed alcohol or drug facilitated penetration.

  • Among women, rape includes vaginal, oral, or anal penetration by a male using his penis. It also includes vaginal, oral or anal penetration by a male or female using their fingers or an object.
  • Among men, rape includes oral or anal penetration by a male using his penis. It also includes oral or anal penetration by a male or female using their fingers or an object.

Rape is a type of sexual assault.

Stalking

Stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. It can, in some cases, lead to sexual assault.

Relationship/Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence is a pattern of violent behavior or coercive control by a present or former relationship partner. Abusers use physical and sexual violence, threats, emotional insults and economic deprivation as a way to dominate their partners. (Susan Schechter, as quoted by Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence)